Archive | November 2011

Foraging for Resources in the Multicore Present and Future

HPC consultant Wolfgang Gentzsch has thoughtfully updated the case of multicore architectures in the HPC context. Over on LinkedIn, via one of the HPC discussion groups, I responded with:

I also enjoyed your article, Wolfgang – thank you. Notwithstanding the drive towards cluster-on-a-chip architectures, HPC customers will require workload managers (WLMs) that interface effectively and efficiently with O/S-level features/functionalities (e.g., MCOPt Multicore Manager from eXludus for Linux, to re-state your example). To me, this is a need well evidenced in the past: For example, various WLMs were tightly integrated with IRIX’s cpuset functionality (http://www.sgi.com/products/software/irix/releases/irix658.html) to allow for topology-aware scheduling in this NUMA-based offering from SGI. In present and future multicore contexts, the appetite for petascale and exascale computing will drive the need for such WLM-O/S integrations. In addition to the multicore paradigm, what makes ‘this’ future particularly interesting, is that some of these multicore architectures will exist in a hybrid (CPU/GPU) cloud – a cloud that may compliment in-house resources via some bursting capability (e.g., Bright’s cloud bursting, http://www.brightcomputing.com/Linux-Cluster-Cloud-Bursting.php). As you also well indicated in your article, it is incumbent upon all stakeholders to ensure that this future is a friendly as possible (e.g., for developers and users). To update a phrase originally spun by Herb Sutter (http://www.gotw.ca/publications/concurrency-ddj.htm) in the multicore context, not only is the free lunch over, its getting tougher to find and ingest lunches you’re willing to pay for!

We certainly live in interesting times!

Advances in Storm Chasing

ScienceLive will be hosting an online chat today at 3 pm on advances in storm chasing.

Participants will have the chance to send questions to experts on the topic: Bradley Smull of the NSF and Sonia Lasher-Trapp of Purdue.

For more, please see http://news.sciencemag.org/sciencenow/2011/11/live-chat-the-science-of-storm-c.html?ref=hp.